Press Clipping
01/05/2017
Article
GlobalFEST brings performers from Korea, Cuba, more to NYC

Now in its 14th year, globalFEST brings musicians from around the world to North America with the goal of building bridges across cultures and increasing the audience for international music.
This year’s lineup ranges from African soul and jazz, Eastern European electronica and Argentine tango to Korean pop, while also finding room for some traditional American musical forms.
Here’s a look at who’s playing at globalFEST, which hits Webster Hall on Jan. 8.
Batida (Angola/Portugal)
Pedro Coquenao first began working under the name
Pedro Coquenao first began working under the name Batida while hosting a radio show promoting African music. As a DJ, he combines 1970s tracks from his native Angola with modern EDM, then adds in dance, video, photography and other visual elements.
(Credit: Batida)
Jojo Abot (Ghana/Denmark/New York)
Abot is a Ghanian singer whose music encompasses
Abot is a Ghanian singer whose music encompasses soul, jazz, Afrobeat and electronica. In addition to music, Abot is also a talented designer, photographer and filmmaker. Some fans may have caught Abot when she opened for Lauryn Hill at Radio City Music Hall last fall.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
Betsayda Machado y La Parranda El Clavo (Venezuela)
Betsayda Machado is a Venezuelan singer from El
Betsayda Machado is a Venezuelan singer from El Clavo, Barlovento, an area inhabited by descendants of African workers. Known as "The Black Voice of Barlovento" Machado has been famous in her area since the age of seven and is now recognized across her home country as an icon of Afro-Venezuelan music.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
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Rare Essence (Washington, D.C.)
Rare Essence has been one of the leading
Rare Essence has been one of the leading bands in D.C.'s famous go-go scene since the mid-'70s. The band's high-energy shows, audience call-and-response and funky, percussion heavy sound has won it fans including Sean Combs and Doug E. Fresh.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
SsingSsing (Korea)
SsingSsing combines traditional Korean folk songs with rock
SsingSsing combines traditional Korean folk songs with rock music, adding a theatrical stage show and a visual style influenced by Madonna.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
Rudresh Mahanthappa’s Indo-Pak Coalition (New York)
Mahanthappa first became known for his work with
Mahanthappa first became known for his work with pianist and composer Vijay Iyer. With his Indo-Pak Coalition, he combines American jazz with the music of South Asia.
(Credit: Jordan Hemingway )
L’Orchestre Afrisa International et M’bilia Bel (Democratic Republic of Congo/USA)
Despite the death of bandleader Tabu Ley Rochereau
Despite the death of bandleader Tabu Ley Rochereau in 2013, L'Orchestre Afrisa continues performing rumba -- a danceable combination of Cuban and African music. The band, which was created in the 1960s, features singer M'Bilia Bel, who was discovered by Rochereau and later married him.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
Septeto Santiaguero (Cuba)
Septeto Santiaguero formed more than 20 years ago
Septeto Santiaguero formed more than 20 years ago and are regular performers at Casa de la Trova, one of Cuba's most famous nightclubs. The group's 2015 album "No Quiero Llanto -- Tributo a Los Compadres," won a Latin Grammy for best traditional tropical album.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
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Ranky Tanky (South Carolina)
Ranky Tanky is a South Carolina Sea Islands
Ranky Tanky is a South Carolina Sea Islands Gullah phrase meaning "work it" or "get funky." The band's repertoire includes Southern jazz, blues, gospel and folk music, with styles ranging from "playful game songs to ecstatic shouts, from heartbreaking spirituals to delicate lullabies."
(Credit: Reese Moore )
Maarja Nuut featuring Hendrik Kaljujarv (Estonia)
Nuut is a fiddler and singer who merges
Nuut is a fiddler and singer who merges traditional music with live electronics, while Kaljujarv is an electronic composer. Together, the pair promises a collaboration that combines Nuut's "hypnotic acoustic loops with more edgy electronic sounds."
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
Alsarah and the Nubatones (Sudan/Brooklyn)
Alsarah was born in Sudan, spent part of
Alsarah was born in Sudan, spent part of her youth in Yemen, then moved to the United States to escape a civil war at the age of 12. She studied ethnomusicology at Wesleyan University before moving to Brooklyn. With her band, the Nubatones, she makes what she called "East-African Retro-Pop," influenced by Nubian "songs of return" from the 1960s and '70s.
(Credit: Rock Paper Scissors )
Hoba Hoba Spirit (Morocco)
Sometimes referred to as the
Sometimes referred to as the "Moroccan Clash," Hoba Hoba Spirit mixes rock, reggae and North African Gnawa music. Like the Clash did with 1970s England, Hoba Hoba Spirit's songs look at the challenges faced by young people in today's Moroccan society.